Celebrating Jarman

Celebrating Jarman

To King’s College London on Saturday for the symposium Early Modern Jarman. This was a contribution to the excellent Jarman 2014 celebration of the life and work of the filmmaker, artist and activist Derek Jarman who died from AIDS-related illness on 19 February 1994. Among much else, the day offered the chance to see Pandemonium, an exhibition in the Inigo Rooms at Somerset House, which remains open (and is free) until 9 March. There are other events in the coming weeks including Queer Pagan Punk: Derek Jarman, an extensive films retrospective at BFI Southbank (including The Last of England, 1998, above). And specifically related to the themes of the symposium is a screening on 28 February of Jarman’s 1991 film Edward II in St Nicholas Church, Deptford. The church is the resting place of Christopher Marlowe, author of Edward II and the focus also this year of anniversary celebrations, Marlowe450.
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Videos for the weekend

Videos for the weekend

I have my colleague Todd Macdonald to thank for the weekend’s first clip: a timelapse panorama of the courtyard observed by Jeff (James Stewart, above) in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954). Todd was laid up with a bug for much of the week and instead of spying on his neighbours he watched a lot of stuff online – and chronicled this on a blog post. Jeff Desom‘s remix was one of his discoveries – and it’s a revelatory reworking of the film and the studio space in which it was made. The artist also shows this as an installation. Across the jump there are nine other clips that I encountered during the week that I hope you may enjoy.


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Something for the weekend

Something for the weekend

It’s been something of a crazy week – and I’m acutely aware that I’ve neglected the blog. We’re finishing off my colleague Linda Zuck’s film for More 4, Vic Reeves’ Turner Prize moments (to be broadcast on 4 December), and preparing for an announcement of a new Shakespeare film for television this coming Thursday. There are iPad apps to which we’re contributing, another big performance film (hopefully) for the end of next year, and much more besides. Not to mention the continuing research work on the Screen Plays: Theatre Plays on British Television project. Apologies – I’ll do better next week. Meanwhile, here’s the weekend’s usual list of free (and largely legal) recommendations of alternative online viewing. First off, don’t forget the first and second episodes of The Killing, Series Two, above, at 9pm on BBCFour tonight and on iPlayer afterwards – nine more below.
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Sunday links

Sunday links

At his Confessions of an aca-fan web site, Henry Jenkins discusses a richly illustrated and fascinating post from the USC Civic Paths research group, The visual culture of the occupation: month one and counting. The stand-off at St Paul’s makes this study of the images created by #Occupy movement all the more pertinent. ‘The Civic Paths team has been studying alternative forms of activism,’ Jenkins explains, ‘especially those which involve the intersection between popular culture, participatory culture, and youth, for more than two years.’ And he adds his own gloss to the visual analysis: ‘Occupy is not so much a movement, at least not as we’ve traditionally defined political movements, as it is a provocation. If the mainstream media has difficulty identifying its goals, it may be because its central goal is to provoke discussion, to get people talking about things which our political leadership has refused to address for several decades now.’ Below, the usual Sunday miscellany of further links to good stuff.
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