Links for the weekend

Links for the weekend

On at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art until 27 May there’s an exhibition that I really want to see. Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity is a sumptuous assembly of 80 or so figure paintings along with ‘period costumes, accessories, fashion plates, photographs, and popular prints’ which explore the relationship between fashion and art from the mid-1860s to the mid-1880s. But I’m pretty certain that I won’t get there before the end of next month and so I’m contenting myself with frequent virtual visits to the show – and, you know, I’m OK with that. The Met has a really good web site about the show with a room-by-room guide and great photos; there’s a catalogue of exceptional splendour and sumptuousness edited by curator Gloria Groom; and I can read detailed criticism about it like Paris: The thrill of the modern by Anka Muhlstein in the New York Review of Books. Who needs Manhattan? Below, more links to more stuff, with thanks for recommendations this week to @emilybell and @KeyframeDaily.
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Links for the weekend

Links for the weekend

There’s one straight-up, stand-out recommendation this week, Eric Naiman’s lengthy essay for The Times Literary Supplement, When Dickens met Dostoevsky. It’s the tale of a notable literary hoax about an alleged meeting encounter between the two authors in 1862, but of course it’s also about what we fervently want to be true and why. Some of the same ideas run through The Fort Bragg murders – is Jeffery MacDonald innocent?. This is another of this week’s good long reads, in this case from Andrew Anthony in theGuardian about truth, relativism and the 1970 murders about which Joe McGinniss, Janet Malcolm and now Errol Morris have written notable books. Below, there are further links to interesting stuff, with thanks this week for recommendations from @audiovisualcy, @manovich and @poniewozick.
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Links for the weekend

Links for the weekend

On Friday Netflix made available simultaneously all thirteen episodes of its House of Cards re-make (above). The serial, starring Kevin Spacey and directed by David Fincher, has had a mixed press – Alessandra Stanley for The New York Times described it as ‘a delicious immorality play with an excellent cast, but the tempo is slow and oddly ponderous’. But it is the innovative release strategy that has attracted most attention. This has been shaped by the recognition that in the age of DVDs and DVRs our viewing habits are changing in fundamental ways. As Brian Selter writes in The New York Times, ‘People have been known to brag about finishing a whole 12-episode season of Homeland in one sitting.’ (We watched just the three shows on Friday night.) Selter is good on the changes, as is Mark Sweney for the Guardian and Tim Carmody for The Verge, who says House of Cards is ‘more like a thirteen-part movie than episodic TV’. Across the jump, more links to more interesting stuff, with recommendation h/ts to among others @nictate, @annehelen, @prodnose, @bergersmicer and @Geoff_Andrew.
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Links for the weekend

Links for the weekend

There’s really only story that I can lead with this week, even if you have already seen it. Here is what happens when you cast Lindsay Lohan in your movie is Stephen Rodrick’s tale for The New York Times about the making of a low-budget movie by director Paul Schrader. It is a compelling read that is by turns funny, shocking and a touch tragic – and it follows in a distinguished line of ‘new journalism’ features about Hollywood that stretches back at least to Lilian Ross‘ wonderful Picture, a 1952 book about the production of The Red Badge of Courage, 1951. There are great photos too, including the one above of Paul Schrader and Lindsay Lohan by Jeff Minton for The New York Times. I can’t promise anything with greater entertainment value, but there are links to further excellent features and resources across the jump. H/ts this week to @Chi_Humanities, @ebertchicago, @annehelen, @ammonite@jayrosen_nyu, @KeyframeDaily and Michael Jackson.
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12 blogs from 2012

12 blogs from 2012

The most popular strand of this blog is the ‘Links for the week’ feature that I aim to post each Sunday. Although I pick up my recommendations from Twitter and Facebook as well as my general reading around the web, many of the links that I include come from a core of blogs that I find particularly valuable and that constantly engage and enlighten me. So for this final ‘Links’ post of the year I thought I would highlight twelve of those blogs and pick out a single post from each from 2012. Normal service will be resumed next Sunday. Happy New Year!
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The week’s links 6-12/5 [Updated]

The week’s links 6-12/5 [Updated]

Working intensively on our BBC film of the RSC’s Julius Caesar over the past few weeks, I’ve missed out on a lot of reading and viewing – not to mention blog recommendations. Today’s column of links (to which as usual I’ll add during the week) is part of the catch-up, and it starts with Epithet, a fascinating short drama with Patrick Stewart directed by Angus Jackson. Written by Mark O’Rowe and inspired by the experience of Stewart and Jackson working together at the Young Vic on Edward Bond’s Bingo, it features the great actor playing ‘an admired and respected poet of middle years’ who is also a womaniser. For background, see also Jackson’s Shakespeare, bear-baiting and bad language – how we made Epithet. Further links in the jump.


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Sunday links

Sunday links

Looking for a Christmas present? For the start of Advent, here are links to my five favourite 2011 exhibition catalogues: Degas and the Ballet: Picturing Movement by Richard Kendall and Jill DeVonyar, from the wonderful Royal Academy of Arts show (above, until 12 December); Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the Twentieth Century by Peter Baki and Colin Ford, also for a wonderful RA show this autumn; de Kooning: a Retrospective by John Elderfield, accompanying the landmark MoMA show (until 9 January); Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art 1945-1980, edited by Rebecca Peabody, Richard Perchuk and Glenn Phillips, which provides the background to all the shows on at present in L. A. and the surrounding area; and Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970-1990 edited by Glenn Adamson and Jane Pavitt for the current V&A show (until 15 January). Across the jump, links to articles that I’ve found interesting across the past week.
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Sunday links

Sunday links

Friday in Denver, Colorado saw the opening of the long-awaited Clyfford Still Museum. The reclusive Abstract Expressionist painter, who died in 1980, stipulated in his will that his personal collection (which was far and away the bulk of his work) should be given to the American city prepared to build him a museum. The fascinating tale is told well by Leah Ollman for The Los Angeles Times in Clyfford Still’s will is executed with Denver museum, while in Abstract expressionist made whole Carol Kino files from Denver for The New York Times. The Denver Post has a terrific slide-show from Friday with images (including the one above) by Andy Cross. [Update: Christopher Knight in The Los Angeles Times is also hugely enthusiastic: 'a graceful small museum, reserved for experiencing one great artist's art.' Inside the new Clyfford Still Museum is a brief New York Times slide-show narrated by the artist's daughter Sandra Still Campbell.] Below, the usual Sunday links to other stuff that interested me during the week.
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Sunday links

Sunday links

At his Confessions of an aca-fan web site, Henry Jenkins discusses a richly illustrated and fascinating post from the USC Civic Paths research group, The visual culture of the occupation: month one and counting. The stand-off at St Paul’s makes this study of the images created by #Occupy movement all the more pertinent. ‘The Civic Paths team has been studying alternative forms of activism,’ Jenkins explains, ‘especially those which involve the intersection between popular culture, participatory culture, and youth, for more than two years.’ And he adds his own gloss to the visual analysis: ‘Occupy is not so much a movement, at least not as we’ve traditionally defined political movements, as it is a provocation. If the mainstream media has difficulty identifying its goals, it may be because its central goal is to provoke discussion, to get people talking about things which our political leadership has refused to address for several decades now.’ Below, the usual Sunday miscellany of further links to good stuff.
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