Links for the week [updated]

Links for the week [updated]

I have lost count of the number of times that I have linked to David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson’s exemplary blog about the history and art of film. Now David Bordwell has scripted and narrated a video essay, Constructive Editing in Robert Bresson’s Pickpocket, that is freely available from there, and because it’s on Vimeo it can be embedded here. Go to the associated blog post for further links.

Across the jump, more links – many of them literary, this week – that I hope you’ll find engaging.
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Weekend links

Weekend links

Yes, my friends, this is another Dickens-themed post (following on from the recent What larks and The film of the films of the books). Or at least the start of it is, because across the jump there’s the usual collection of recent links to interesting and relatively random stuff. But in this first paragraph I want to draw your attention to Charles Dickens, filmmaker, which is a wonderful filmography compiled by The Bioscope of silent film adaptations of Dickens. This includes all sorts of intriguing films, a good number of which are available on DVD, most notably on the invaluable Dickens Before Sound DVD from the BFI. But the image above comes courtesy of the Danish Film Institute from the 1922 David Copperfield directed in Denmark by the Dickens specialist A. W. Sandberg, and there are further stills and clips if you follow the link.
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Something for the weekend

Something for the weekend

Yesterday’s review of The Projection of Britain: A History of the GPO Film Unit attracted a lot of traffic (for which, much thanks). For those interested in British documentaries of the 1930s (and at other times too), the BFI’s recently launched The Reel History of Britain (still in beta) is a treasure trove of films available for free at full-length, including the two documentaries on which John Grierson took a director’s credit: Drifters (1929) and Granton Trawler (1934). But Grierson’s sister Marion was also a significant filmmaker, even if until recently she has been eclipsed by her more far more celebrated relation. The Reel History… features her fascinating Beside the Seaside (1935, above), made not for the GPO but for the Strand Film Company. There are numerous interesting angles to this, including W. H. Auden’s (minimalist) commentary and the camera’s delight in bodies in motion. Across the jump, nine more recommendations for alternative weekend viewing.
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